Wednesday, March 14, 2018

Today in attribution

Imagine -- oh, come on, just go ahead and close your eyes and imagine -- a world in which a reporter* could explain what pi meant without having to quote the piday.com website.

You can even leave out the worlds in which people still consulted stylebooks on how to render dates, or in which commas knew their place, though I'd appreciate some word from overseas on how Pi Day is celebrated in those "worldwide" places where March 14 is 14/3.

* Your Editor was there on a fine day some 25 years ago when a page designer (from NC State, no less) caught a Star Reporter leaving pretty much all the zeroes out of Avogadro's number.

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5 Comments:

Anonymous Picky said...

Oh, we celebrate it for the whole of March every 14th year. Although when I say “we” I am approximating. Because I’ve never celebrated it at all.

7:56 AM, March 15, 2018  
Blogger Electric Dragon said...

In the UK we celebrate it on the 31st of April (think about it...). In Japan it will be celebrated on the 9th of May, 3141.

In ISOland, I don't think it's possible to ever celebrate it..

2:07 PM, March 15, 2018  
Blogger Electric Dragon said...

I tell a lie, it must be possible to celebrate it with any ISO date as eventually all 4 digit numbers must occur in pi. As long as you're prepared to wait long enough...

2:08 PM, March 15, 2018  
Anonymous Picky said...

Yep, I accept your correction. Last time I celebrated it was on the 31st April.

8:47 AM, March 16, 2018  
Blogger Thomas Lumley said...

One accepted alternative is to celebrate Pi Approximation Day on the 22nd of July.

Some extreme nerds have argued for Pi Continued Fraction Day, 3rd July. (background: https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/roots-of-unity/don-8217-t-recite-digits-to-celebrate-pi-recite-its-continued-fraction-instead/)

@ElectricDragon: I don't think anyone's actually proved that pi has all possible sequences, though that's the way I'd bet.

2:39 AM, March 24, 2018  

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