Monday, February 09, 2009

Audience participation: Editing tests

Here's another chance for all you ships at sea to advance the art of editing -- or at least the way we understand it and teach it. Pls feel free to answer in the comments or by e-mail to the address at right:

What are the five most important grammar points editors need to know?

What five grammar points would you expect to be on any editing test? (Not necessarily the same thing, though it's fine if your answers are the same for both.)

What are the five most important style points editors need to know?

What five style points would you expect to be on any editing test?

Pls indicate which identity hat you're wearing: journalist (current or former), journalism educator, other educator, nonjournalistic editor, other interested party.

No names associated with answers unless you do so in a reply (which is fine).

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2 Comments:

Blogger Old Word Wolf said...

Grammar: five basic comma rules – three grammatical and two “artificial.”
1. Comma precedes the conjunction that joins two independent clauses; no comma precedes the conjunction that links a dependent clause onto the end of an independent clause.
2. Comma goes after the introductory word or phrase that precedes the main clause.
3. Commas go before and after a parenthetical, appositive, or otherwise interrupting word or phrase.
4. Commas go before and after the name of a state when preceded by a city name.
5. Commas appear between day and year in American style dates; omit the comma when the date is just month and year. (OK, this last one's style)
Style:
1. Know AP or house styles for addresses, dates and abbreviations in copy and headlines.
2. Know AP or house styles for common spelling issues.
3. Know AP or house styles for units of measurement, technical and scientific terms, and locally significant measurements and terms that deal with whatever goes in Your Town: glass blowing, hog farming, tulip growing, etc.
Local Knowledge:
1. Know your area and regional demographics by heart: how many, what age, ethnicity, income strata.
2. Know local and regional elected officials’ birth names and middle initials by heart.
3. Read and understand the annual reports of the key (three to five) corporations that employ people and make money in your circulation area.
4. Know and understand the key (three to five) environmental and economic issues in your circulation area.
5. Know and understand how area public school districts score compulsory competency exams.

9:13 AM, February 10, 2009  
Blogger JD (The Engine Room) said...

"Know AP or house styles for common spelling issues" - I'm not sure that this one is so important, as long as they know to check...

3:22 PM, February 16, 2009  

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